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P3 Online Learning

P3 Online Learning

TEAMS CHECK IN TIME 10:30-11:00 MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY

P1-3 will continue to use SeeSaw for online learning. It would be helpful if you could let us know in school hours as soon as possible if you are having trouble accessing SeeSaw.

We would also like to move towards providing opportunities for P1-3 children to interact with staff online via Microsoft Teams. We issued passwords before the holiday and will spend week beginning 11th January supporting families to get their accounts operational. We aim to begin hosting some live check-in times with the P1-3 pupils –at pre-arranged times in the week– from 18 January using Microsoft Teams’ two-way video functionality.

PLEASE READ THE ATTACHED RESPONSIBLE USE GUIDES AND SHARE WITH YOUR CHILD. CONTACT admin@sciennes.edin.sch.uk IF YOU DO NOT GIVE PERMISSION FOR THIS.

There is a link to Teams on the right hand side of this Class Page where you can log in directly using your child’s username 123456 and password.

Alternatively:

Google ‘o365’ (for Office 365)
enter your child’s email address 123456@ea.edin.sch.uk
then enter username and password

¿Qué te gustaría comer? – What would you like to eat?

Healthy Food Clipart - Download Free Vectors, Clipart Graphics ...

Hola Primary Two.

¿Qué tal? ¡Tengo hambre! (I am hungry!)

This week’s Spanish challenge is to find out the words for different foods and to say what you would like to eat, as if you were in a Spanish restaurant.


¿Qué te gustaría comer? – What would you like to eat?

¿Qué te gustaría beber? – What would you like to drink?

Me gustaría… – I would like …

Un sándwich – a sandwich

Una ensalada – a salad

Una pizza – a pizza

Una hamburguesa – a hamburger

Salchichas – sausages

Pasta – pasta

Fruta – fruit

Patatas fritas – crisps

Papas fritas – chips

Un pastel – a cake

Una galleta – a biscuit

Un helado – an ice cream

Leche – milk

Jugo – juice

Agua – water

Desayuno – breakfast

Almuerzo – lunch

Cena – dinner

*Ms F’s Top Tip* – Remember j in Spanish makes a sound like ch asin the Scottish word loch. So jugo sounds like choo-go. When you see ll in Spanish, it is actually a special letter. The sound it makes is y, like in ‘you’, so galleta sounds like ga-ye-ta. You may recognise it from me llamo (my name is) and amarillo (yellow) and llueve (rain). Remember that h is always silent in Spanish, so helado sounds like el-ad-o.

Ideas to help you practise

  • See if you can say what you are having for dinner or lunch today in Spanish.
  • Take out some items from your cupboards and practise saying the Spanish when someone in your house picks a certain item.
  • Practise your Spanish along with Mrs McCracken’s sign-a-long for picnic foods – this was a few weeks ago but you can still find it on the blog.
  • Make a menu using these Spanish words for food. You could write the English next to it or draw a picture of the food to help you remember.

¡Que te diviertas! 

Ms Ferguson

Here are some fun songs to help you practise and learn some other words for different types of foods.

Music ‘Lark Ascending’ by Vaughan Williams

Last week we looked at how an image can inspire a composer to write a piece of music.

This week we are listening to a piece by an English Composer called Vaughan Williams. He wrote it in 1914 at the beginning of the first World War. This was a time of great conflict and uncertainty. Even though there were things going on around him he did not like or could control, he could still see the beauty in nature.

The music tells the tale of a skylark singing an impossibly beautiful, almost heavenly, song.

Watch the clip as Molly Rainford introduces Vaughan Williams’ The Lark Ascending.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/ten-pieces/classical-music-vaughan-williams-lark-ascending/znwdbdm

Scottish violinist, Nicola Benedetti is playing the piece. She plays it with such grace and ease, but it is one of the most difficult pieces ever written.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/ten-pieces/classical-music-vaughan-williams-lark-ascending/znwdbdm

Why do you think Vaughan Williams chose a violin to play this piece?

What can you say about the pitch of the violin during the piece and how has he grouped the notes together?

What other instruments of the orchestra can you name?

I love this piece. I hope you do too.

Mrs Campbell

 

 

¡Me gustan los deportes! – I like sports!

The Importance of Hobbies for Kids - SportsTyme

Hola Primary Two.

¿Qué tal? ¡Estoy feliz porque me gustan los deportes! (I am happy because I like sports.)

This week’s Spanish challenge is to find out the words for sports and hobbies, and how to give an opinion.

Some of the different activities have a different word for ‘the’ at the beginning. Some start with el and some start with la. Why do you think that is? (Answer: under the Spanish words.)

¿Te gusta…? – Do you like…?

Me gusta… – I like…

No me gusta… – I do not like…

El fútbol – football

El tenis – tennis

La gimnasia – gymnastics

El footing – running / correr – to run

El rugby – rugby

El ciclismo – cycling

La natación – swimming / nadar – to swim

El bailar – dancing / bailar – to dance

El canto – singing / cantar – to sing

La pintura – painting / pintar – to paint

El dibujo – drawing / dibujar – to draw

La costura – sewing / coser – to sew

La leer – reading / leer – to read

*Ms F’s Top Tip* – Remember j in Spanish makes a sound like ch asin the Scottish word loch. So dibujo sounds like di-boo-cho. In Spanish the letter c can make a hard sound like ‘cuatro’ if it comes before a, o or u. But if c comes before e or i, it makes a soft ‘ss’ sound. So ciclismo sounds like sea-clis-mo.

Answer: The reason why some animals have different versions of saying the in Spanish is that some are male words, they start with el, and others are female words, starting with la. Well done if you worked that out!

You may have noticed I used gustan instead of gusta when talking about sports. That is because it is more than one thing I am talking about. So you would say ‘Me gustan los colores’, if you wanted to say I like colours.

Ideas to help you practise

  • Play a game of charades where a sport or hobby is acted out and you have to guess it in Spanish.
  • Gather objects around the house related to the sports and hobbies (such as a tennis ball, pencil, swimming costume). Ask a parent or sibling to hold up an item, then you have say the correct Spanish word.
  • Practise your Spanish along with Mrs McCracken’s sign-a-long sport and hobbies.
  • If you have drawn a picture of children in the playground doing a sport or hobby, as Ms McCracken suggested in her Sign-a-long blog, label this with the Spanish words for each hobby.

¡Que te diviertas! 

Ms Ferguson

Here are some fun videos to help you practise and learn some other words for sports and actions.

Music BBC Ten Pieces – The Night Ferry by Anna Clyne

 

This week we are thinking about how art can inspire a composer to write a piece of music.

As we have been studying Grace Darling and how she saved some shipwrecked sailors, I thought this piece of music perfectly captured the mood of the sea that night – dark and stormy.

Follow the link and listen to the music:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/ten-pieces/ten-pieces-at-home/zjy3382

What do you think? Does it make you imagine a ship out at sea being tossed about in the waves?

It’s fascinating to think the composer Anna Clyne began this composition after seeing an image of a wave.  She drew a picture before going to the piano to write the music.

Using materials you might find around your home, follow artist Amy Leung’s step by step guide on how to create a sculpture using ‘Night Ferry’ to inspire shapes, patterns and textures.

You might like to upload a photo of your sculpture to the Ten Pieces website or send a photo to your teacher on SeeSaw.

Another very famous composer called Mussorgsky wrote a whole series of music after he had visited an art gallery. It is called ‘Pictures at an Exhibition’.

Follow the link to see the paintings he wrote music to go along with.

How would you describe some of the music – happy, angry, sad?

 

 

¡Soy yo! – It’s me!

21 great questions for facilitators - Part 2 - RosemaryShapiroLiu ...

Hola Primary Two.

¿Qué tal? ¡Estoy feliz porque hoy hace sol! (I’m happy because it is sunny today!)

This week will be all about you in Spanish – how to ask and answer questions like what is your name, age and where do you live.

¿Cómo te llamas? – What is your name?

Me llamo… – My name is …

Me llamo Toby. – My Name is Toby.

¿Y tú? – And you? 

¿Tienes cuantos años? – How old are you?

Tengo ….. años – I am …. years old.

Tengo ocho años – I am eight years old.

¿Cuando es tu cumpleaños? – When is your birthday?

Mi cumpleaños es ….. – My birthday is

Mi cumpleaños es veintitrés de mayo. – My birthday is the 23rd of May.

¿Dónde vives? – Where do you live?

Vivo en Edimburgo / escocia – I live in Edinburgh / Scotland.

*Ms F’s Top Tip* – When you see ll in Spanish, it is actually a special letter. The sound it makes is y, like in ‘you’, so estrella sounds like es-tray-ya. You may recognise it from me llamo (my name is) and amarillo (yellow) and llueve (rain). In Spanish the letter ñ is also a special letter, where you make a nyu sound, so año sounds like an-yo. You might remember seeing it in mañana (tomorrow) or araña (spider).

So, a simple conversation might sound like: 

Maria: ¡Hola! ¿Cómo te llamas? 

Tomás: ¡Hola! Me llamo Tomás. ¿Y Tú? 

Maria: Me llamo Maria.

Tomas: ¿Tienes cuantos años?  

Maria: Tengo ocho años. ¿Y tú? 

Tomás: Tengo ocho años. 

Maria: ¿Dónde vives? Etc.  

Ideas to help you practise

  • Create your own all about me flashcards – one set with the Spanish words and another set with a picture or photo of the answer. You can then use these to play a game of memory, match pairs, or create your own game.
  • Have a conversation with a parent or sibling. See if you can teach them how to say the Spanish words.
  • Write out these questions and your answers – put them up in your house so you can practise saying these.
  • Make an ‘all about me’ poster with a picture of you in the middle and the questions (with answers) around the outside.
  • Make a sock puppet and use it to practise asking and answering questions in Spanish.

¡Que te diviertas! 

Ms Ferguson

Here are some fun songs to help you practise.

A la Orilla del Mar – On the Seashore

Cartoon Sea Animals Relaxing On The Beach Stock Vector ...

Hola Primary Two.

¿Qué tal? ¡Estoy feliz porque me gusta la playa! (I’m happy because I like the beach.)

This week’s Spanish challenge is to find out the names for some things that live on the seashore.

Some of the animals have a different word for ‘the’ at the beginning. Some start with el and some start with la. Why do you think that is? (Answer: under the Spanish words.)

¿Que vive a la orilla del mar? – What lives at the seashore?

El cangrejo – crab

La gaviota – seagull

La foca – seal

El alga marina – seaweed

El caballo de mar – seahorse

La ballena – whale

El pulpo – octopus

El delfín – Dolphin

La anémona de mar – sea anemone

El erizo de mar – sea urchin

La estrella de mar – starfish

La concha – Shell

El percebe – barnacle

El frailecillo – puffin

La medusa – jellyfish

*Ms F’s Top Tip* – Remember j in Spanish makes a sound like ch asin the Scottish word loch. So cangrejo sounds like can-grey-cho. When you see ll in Spanish, it is actually a special letter. The sound it makes is y, like in ‘you’, so estrella sounds like es-tray-ya. You may recognise it from me llamo (my name is) and amarillo (yellow) and llueve (rain). In Spanish the letter c can make a hard sound like ‘cuatro’ if it comes before a, o or u. But if c comes before e or i, it makes a soft ‘ss’ sound. So frailecillo sounds like fray-le-seayo.

Answer: The reason why some animals have different versions of saying the in Spanish is that some are male words and others are female words. Well done if you worked that out!

For male animals you would use el for ‘the’ or un for ‘a’. For female animals you would use la for ‘the’ and una for ‘a’.

Most of the animals you just add s to the end to say there is more than one (plural). The only different one is:

Dolphins – delfines

Ideas to help you practise

  • Create your own seashore flashcards – one set with the Spanish words and another set with a picture or photo of something that lives at the seashore. You can then use these to play a game of memory, match pairs, or create your own game.
  • Practise your Spanish along with Mrs McCracken’s sign-a-long animals – remember we learned the word for fish last week.
  • Play Pictionary, where one player has to draw something from the seashore and the other says the answer in Spanish.
  • Pick something that lives at the seashore and act like it, you could use sounds or actions. The other player has to guess in Spanish.
  • Draw a picture of the seashore and label what lives there in Spanish.

¡Que te diviertas! 

Ms Ferguson

Here are some fun videos to help you practise and learn some other words for animals, including wild animals:

¿Tienes mascotas? – Do you have pets?

pets – SafeDeposits

Hola Primary Two.

¿Qué tal? ¡Estoy feliz porque me gusta animales! (I’m happy because I like animals.)

This week’s Spanish challenge is to find out how to say I have pets and name some animals.

Some of the animals have two different ways of saying the animal. One that ends in o and one that ends in a. Why do you think that is? (Answer: under the Spanish words.)

¿Tienes mascota / mascotas? –  Do you have a pet / pets? 

¡No tengo mascota! – I don’t have a pet.

Sí, tengo … – Yes, I have …

Un perro / una perra – a dog

Un gato / una gata – a cat 

Un conejo / una coneja – a rabbit 

Un cobayo – a guinea pig 

Una serpiente – a snake 

Un pez – a fish 

Un ratón – a mouse 

Una tortuga – a tortoise 

Un pájaro – a bird 

Un caballo – a horse

*Ms F’s Top Tips* – When you have a double r, like in perro you have to roll your rs, like a purring cat. Remember, j in Spanish makes a sound like ch as in the Scottish word loch. So conejo sounds like coney-cho. When you see ll in Spanish, it is actually a special letter. The sound it makes is y, like in ‘you’, so caballo sounds like cabye-yo. You may recognise it from me llamo (my name is), amarillo (yellow) and llueve (rain).

Answer: The reason why some animals have one Spanish version that ends in o and one that ends in a is that it is for you to say if it is a male or female animal. Well done if you worked that out!

For male animals you would use un and the word ends in o. For female animals you would use una and the word ends in a.

So if you have a male dog, you would say, “Yo tengo un perro.

But, if you had a female dog, you would say, “Yo tengo una perra.”

If you want to say you have a number of pets you could add the number and y (and) to help.

For example, to say “I have three cats, two dogs and four rabbits“, it would be:

Yo tengo tres gatos, dos perros y quatro cabajos.

Most of the animals you just add s to the end to say there is more than one (plural). The only different ones are:

Fish (more than one) – peces

Mice – ratones

Ideas to help you practise

  • Have a conversation with a parent or sibling where you take turns answering ¿Tienes mascotas? (You can make up your answers to make it trickier.)
  • Create your own animal flashcards – one set with the Spanish words and another set with a picture or photo of an animal. You can then use these to play a game of memory, match pairs, or create your own game.
  • Play Pictionary, where you have to draw an animal and say the answer in Spanish.
  • Pick an animal and play ‘articulate’ where one player has to describe the animal using clues, but without saying the name of the animal. The other player has to guess the animal in Spanish.
  • Create a poster or draw animals in your jotter and write the Spanish next to the animals.

¡Que te diviertas! 

Ms Ferguson

Here are some fun songs to help you practise and learn some other words for animals, including farm animals: